2021 Spring

Our international cohort of Falmouth Flexible MA Graphic Design (online) students are encouraged to explore a diverse range of interests and specialisms with global exploration at the heart of the course, leading to a true spectrum of creativity. Scroll to view examples of their Final MA Projects for a taste of what you could achieve by joining the course.

Réuni Manual: Introduction

Réuni Manual: Introduction

Réuni Manual: Chapter Heading Two

Réuni Manual: Chapter Heading Two

Réuni Manual: Cover

Réuni Manual: Cover

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application: Hobbies

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application: Hobbies

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Réuni Matching Algorithm Application

Alice Neve

Bordeaux, France

Project Question

How can design be used to help migrant and refugee teenagers in Bordeaux with community integration at school?

Aim and Objective

Bordeaux is perceived as a beautiful, historic and wealthy city. The architecture, history and wine industry make the city very attractive to residents and visitors alike. However, concealed behind the façade of this aesthetically beautiful and apparently affluent place, is a state of crisis in which social services and healthcare are cracking under the pressure of a growing migrant and refugee population. Through research in previous modules, I have pinpointed an area of intervention in the migrant and refugee crisis that I believe could make a huge difference – not just in terms of alleviating the immediate situation, but, in the longer term, by acting as a locus for educating the next generation on the importance of diversity and inclusion within their school community.

The Problem: At present, there is no form of integration support for migrant and refugee teenagers joining the French education system. They arrive on their first day of school, often feeling frightened, isolated and with limited French language skills. The French students already attending the school have a lack of education surrounding diversity within their community and therefore do not understand how to welcome the newcomers into their school.
This leads to a lack of understanding and sympathy towards refugees and migrants living in their society. Also an ignorance towards the importance of having diversity within a community.

The Solution: Creating an inclusive program that involves welcoming and supporting diversity within the French education system. This will be in two parts: a digital design application incorporating a buddy-matching algorithm, and a detailed hard copy reference manual for program leaders and teachers to support the continuing provision of collaborative social and educational opportunities for both French children and newcomers.

Final Outcome

The Réuni program represents a new approach to integrating migrant and refugee children into the French schooling system. The program not only provides a nurturing and supportive educational environment for newcomers but also helps native French children to understand and embrace diversity within their community. réuni aims to make the newcomer feel welcome, understood, and accepted within the school from day one, carefully monitored and encouraged by program leaders who have been selected to organise and oversee the activities within the program. réuni has been designed to be versatile and flexible so that schools can take their own approach depending on resources, facilities, and timetables within the school. Other factors might also argue in favour of varying the approach to workshops and activities such as cultural differences and individual vulnerabilities. réuni is sensitive to the fact that some activities suggested may not be appropriate for certain groupings and situations.

Réuni is divided into two key stages. The first stage is a digital design application that is made up of a questionnaire that the students and potential students can log in to and participate in. They can create a fun continuous line drawn avatar with colourful shapes and choose what their favourite subjects and hobbies are. The matching algorithm then pairs a new student with one that already attends the school, meaning each new student attending the school will have a buddy for support and friendship; to learn from as well as teach. The application can be downloaded for free via the App Store on the QR code on the réuni website.

The manual is a comprehensive guide for the members of staff involved in the program or program leaders. The manual is filled with all the information they will need about how to: welcome and introduce new students to their buddies; design, structure and organise workshops, and ensure adherence to program goals and ethical requirements.

How has your practice developed while studying the MA in Graphic Design with a global cohort?

Having come from a fashion design background, I felt that my experiences within the design industry were fairly focused on one area.
The diverse and inclusive projects, experiences and community on the Graphic Design MA course at Falmouth University has opened my eyes to the possibilities of how I, as a designer can apply my skills to so many industries and sectors, and in the process, have a positive social impact on the projects I work on as well and those within my locality.
I have learnt that studying within an international cohort can provide such rich and diverse perspectives on design, and spark discussions and questions that I would not necessarily ask myself when designing independently.
Throughout the course, I have felt supported, accepted, and included. I am leaving the course more confident within myself and as a graphic designer.

Please follow this external platform link, to view the Final MA Project in full and/or portfolio documentation.

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Example of the Letter Drawing activity worksheet and a submission

Example of the Letter Drawing activity worksheet and a submission

The website that includes elements of play where visitors can view project details

The website that includes elements of play where visitors can view project details

Maps are integral to the website, showing examples of local typography

Maps are integral to the website, showing examples of local typography

Each of the activities are explained and submissions are celebrated in a gallery

Each of the activities are explained and submissions are celebrated in a gallery

Participants can draw their own letter and combined with data for new art

Participants can draw their own letter and combined with data for new art

The exhibition layout at Winn’s Gallery

The exhibition layout at Winn’s Gallery

The work-in-progress typeface representing architecture of Walthamstow

The work-in-progress typeface representing architecture of Walthamstow

Anna Robinette

Walthamstow, London, UK

Project Question

What is the designer's role in engaging the community with typography and placemaking in Walthamstow?

Aim and Objective

Walthamstow has been recognised as a hub for hundreds of years and has a fascinating history of diverse trades and crafts that people from around the world introduce and develop when they settle here.
Stowe Framework focuses on vernacular typography because it is a power­ful marker of regional identity and has a remarkable ability to capture the character of time and place.
My project aims to engage the Walthamstow community in their typo­graphic environment and to discuss how type influences the way we feel about the content it displays. I aim to highlight the uniformity of corporate advertising, which ignores and subverts local history and tradition, and to collect and document examples of the vanishing symbols of local culture. Other local projects have captured memories through oral history and online archives; Stowe Framework is the first to document typography.

Final Outcome

At the end of eight months, Stowe Framework is just beginning.

ACTIVITIES
To get a thorough understanding of people’s views, I devised activities for the community that include a typography scavenger hunt and art-based creativity that I distributed in groups and schools. The Covid-19 pandemic significantly hampered the primary research within the community, and led to the outcome being a plan for a launch of the activities and website.

WEBSITE & ONLINE TOOLS
A redesigned website includes elements of play where visitors can view project details and its background, engage with the activities, find out event details and explore the project. Maps are integral to the website, showing examples of typography around Walthamstow and locations for the events.

Online, participants can draw their own letter, challenged by different prompts. The results are posted into a gallery and once a threshold for number of letters has been reached, participants can choose to remix letters and distort them. The colour of the letter is decided by the current outside temperature. This tool and function shows how data and community can be merged for satisfying results.

LAUNCH
Stowe Framework would be launched during the E17 Art Trail where people host exhibitions and events on the first weekend of July. A selection of event, such as history and photography walks, would be hosted and include an exhibition at a local gallery, where I would give information about the project and allow visitors to take part in the activities.

TYPEFACE
Walthamstow has been historically industrial, from the London Rubber Company to Walthamstow Film Studios, with sawtooth roofs featured heavily in the skyline. The typeface takes inspiration from this architectural pattern. For my project I have begun to design a new typeface to embody the architectural features, and is summarised as:
“A new variable typeface inspired by the architecture of Walthamstow to embody the innovation powered by the community. Its aesthetics will be geometric to represent the community’s burgeoning awareness of typographic style. It will shift its appearance on weight, width and roundness axes and include the full set of glyphs in Latin and European scripts. It will be designed for eye-catching display type in both print and screen-based media and for free personal use by the community.”

How has your practice developed while studying the MA in Graphic Design with a global cohort?

Please follow this external platform link, to view the Final MA Project in full and/or portfolio documentation.

Visit web site

Overview of the Kindermoord room

Overview of the Kindermoord room

Rows of printed hijab block the entrance to the Morality room

Rows of printed hijab block the entrance to the Morality room

The oversized bike sculpture is hidden under black fabric

The oversized bike sculpture is hidden under black fabric

Bikes Not Bombs - tagged bikes on workstands with audio points

Bikes Not Bombs - tagged bikes on workstands with audio points

Part of the exhibition identity

Part of the exhibition identity

Guidebook examples for Bike Bloc and Bikes Not Bombs

Guidebook examples for Bike Bloc and Bikes Not Bombs

Replica artefacts and labels to build the scrapbooks

Replica artefacts and labels to build the scrapbooks

Tony Clarkson

Shrewsbury, UK

Project Question

Cycling brings many different things to society; how can design tell the story of its diversity and cultural value beyond the stereotypes associated with it?

Aim and Objective

This project has cycling at its centre and the changes that cycling can bring. The aim is to break down the generalised perception of cycling and cyclists and show that it’s not only about fitness, fashion, fads, but people and what they believe in and the struggles they face.

To show through different stories how cycling benefits communities and causes by bringing people together, building confidence and friendships, or delivering a feeling of independence and release, a way to escape or change a situation. To get the full effect of the difference cycling can really make, you need to feel it; you need to connect.

Final Outcome

The outcome is a set of haptic rooms forming an experiential exhibition where graphic design, image, light, sound and smells are layered to recreate different circumstances. The exhibition aims to heighten the senses required to understand unfamiliar situations and conditions faced by cyclists. The concept shows extremes, each room has its own story and a means for visitors to connect with that story and take it home.

Think beyond an exhibition stand – look at using an entire room; floor, ceiling, walls. Make the visitor climb up, lie down, squeeze through spaces—change temperatures and atmospheres; noise, silence, oppression, reaction. Visitors get to feel what it is like to have the adrenaline rush brought on by a long winding descent in the summer air, the heightened senses from inside a protesting crowd, the cold, the heat, the pressures, the sounds, all coming together.

Interaction: Touch-screens, lighting that tracks your movement, exhibits to push through and pull out of the way to enter the room and others to tear and collect into guides to build up an individual scrapbook of events.

Scale: Oversized objects represent the value of the bicycle and the story being told. A change of scale can make things overwhelming and strengthen a message; it can emphasise its importance, whether it is an object, an image or a typographic display – they have the same effect.

Sound and light: What is the effect of different lighting? Combine interactive sounds, visuals, lighting and music to create a feeling. Then change the soundtrack, increase the volume or interrupt the rhythm. Combine the lighting with the sound of the police and voices distorted through a loudhailer; what feelings would follow?

Visual: Each room is different in terms of aesthetics, content and structure but ties into an underlying visual identity connecting everything into a singular event; literature, publicity, exhibition guides and wayfinding. Each room has its own guide for visitors to pick up; colours clearly identify each room.

The interactivity of the rooms is extended through the print, guides and replica artefacts; protest placards, photos, stickers, badges, statements and personal stories. Building up scrapbooks of the exhibition by adding these messages and artefacts means that the visitors complete the guides. The layout structure means there’s no right or wrong way to fill them; the items aren’t numbered like a football album, and there are no captions to follow. It’s not a National Trust treasure hunt. The replica content is there to pick up from the rooms all around the exhibition space.

How has your practice developed while studying the MA in Graphic Design with a global cohort?

The global cohort brings different cultures together. They may only be slight differences, but being exposed to them and other ways of thinking and working helped me experience and develop a more comprehensive design approach beyond the usual confines of my studio.

The structure of this MA means you have to step up, and through it, I have rediscovered the value of collaboration, research and discussion, bringing me even more ways to improve my practice.

Please follow this external platform link, to view the Final MA Project in full and/or portfolio documentation.

Visit web site

Experimentation, Playtesting & Design Development

Experimentation, Playtesting & Design Development

Exclusive Glow in the Dark Barrier Tapes for Kickstarter Backers

Exclusive Glow in the Dark Barrier Tapes for Kickstarter Backers

Barrier Tapes designed to blend in with specific board games

Barrier Tapes designed to blend in with specific board games

An infographic created for my Business Plan

An infographic created for my Business Plan

Creating a brand and website for the kits

Creating a brand and website for the kits

Alice Marlow

Worcestershire, UK

Project Question

How can graphic design improve the accessibility of board games, creating a more user-friendly experience for players with disabilities?

Aim and Objective

Research shows that a higher percentage of disabled people feel lonely compared with non-disabled people, and a shocking 75% of young adults with a disability report that they are lonely.

One of the main barriers to tackling loneliness is accessibility. How can someone with a disability increase their social interactions if they are physically unable to take part in the day-to-day activities that many of us take for granted?

One social activity that has soared in popularity in recent years is playing board games – and no, I’m not talking about Monopoly. Modern board games such as Ticket to Ride, Pandemic, and many more provide a platform for players to connect and form friendships.

Ensuring hobbies such as board games are more accessible for everybody is one way we can tackle loneliness among people with disabilities. A physical gathering around a board game table is a special, social event that no digital or video game can replicate.

The mental health benefits of playing board games are well documented, from the cognitive benefits of keeping your brain active to the social benefits of playing games with friends. Tabletop games have been proven to combat isolation and as a result reduce feelings of anxiety and depression in adults. We should, therefore, ensure that this hobby is accessible to as many people as possible, and certainly to those who are more vulnerable to poor mental health and feelings of loneliness, such as those with a disability.

Unfortunately, many board games are not published with accessibility in mind, and I therefore chose to address this for my Final MA Project. Rather than design a new game, I wanted to address the lack of accessibility in existing games, so that everyone could feel welcome at the table, no matter the game being played.

Final Outcome

For my final outcome I designed the Board Game Accessibility Kit, an idea born from research conducted among the tabletop gaming community and conversations with industry experts. From my own love of playing board games, I was familiar with frequently used game mechanics and components, and realised that the key to removing accessibility barriers across multiple games was to focus on the universal components that all gamers are familiar with.

Most games are made up of base components that change very little in terms of functionality – a board (or sometimes many tiles that make up a board), and 1cm cubes, often in multiple colours, that represent an in-game resource, monster, or similar.

These simple sounding components present quite the accessibility challenge for anybody who struggles with more dexterity-based games – precise movements are often required to place a cube on a specific area of the board. As a game progresses, the board can quickly become covered in these cubes. It only takes one accidental nudge of the board to disrupt the placement of these cubes and cause confusion for everyone playing. This can turn fun to frustration in a matter of seconds for anybody who struggles with grip, precision, or a tremor.

The kit that I designed comes with magnetic versions of these game components, and tools to help you adapt a range of games to suit your own accessibility needs. A magnetic playmat instantly turns your whole game board magnetic, while smaller adhesive magnets can be fixed to individual tiles or pieces. Barrier tape brings the whole thing together, both protecting the original game components from the harsher adhesive of the magnets, and helping to seamlessly blend the kit in with original game artwork.

At the time of submitting this project, the Board Game Accessibility Kit was poised ready to launch on Kickstarter, a prospect I am hugely excited by.

How has your practice developed while studying the MA in Graphic Design with a global cohort?

Working with so many talented designers from all across the world has absolutely helped me develop my skills and confidence. I have been exposed to many new ways of thinking and creating, and our shared online studio spaces have helped us feel far more connected than I expected from an online course.

Please follow this external platform link, to view the Final MA Project in full and/or portfolio documentation.

Visit web site